The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale
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The Last September is Elizabeth Bowen''s portrait of a young woman''s coming of age in a brutalized time and place, where the ordinariness of life floats like music over the impending doom of history.

In 1920, at their country home in County Cork, Sir Richard Naylor and his wife, Lady Myra, and their friends maintain a skeptical attitude toward the events going on around them, but behind the facade of tennis parties and army camp dances, all know that the end is approaching—the end of British rule in the south of Ireland and the demise of a way of life that had survived for centuries. Their niece, Lois Farquar, attempts to live her own life and gain her own freedoms from the very class that her elders are vainly defending. The Last September depicts the tensions between love and the longing for freedom, between tradition and the terrifying prospect of independence, both political and spiritual.

"Brilliant.... A successful combination of social comedy and private tragedy."— The Times Literary Supplement (London)

Review

"Brilliant.... A successful combination of social comedy and private tragedy."-- The Times Literary Supplement (London)

From the Inside Flap


The Last September is Elizabeth Bowen''s portrait of a young woman''s coming of age in a brutalized time and place, where the ordinariness of life floats like music over the impending doom of history.

In 1920, at their country home in County Cork, Sir Richard Naylor and his wife, Lady Myra, and their friends maintain a skeptical attitude toward the events going on around them, but behind the facade of tennis parties and army camp dances, all know that the end is approaching?the end of British rule in the south of Ireland and the demise of a way of life that had survived for centuries. Their niece, Lois Farquar, attempts to live her own life and gain her own freedoms from the very class that her elders are vainly defending. The Last September depicts the tensions between love and the longing for freedom, between tradition and the terrifying prospect of independence, both political and spiritual.

"Brilliant.... A successful combination of social comedy and private tragedy."? The Times Literary Supplement (London)

From the Back Cover

The Last September is Elizabeth Bowen''s portrait of a young woman''s coming of age in a brutalized time and place, where the ordinariness of life floats like music over the impending doom of history.
In 1920, at their country home in County Cork, Sir Richard Naylor and his wife, Lady Myra, and their friends maintain a skeptical attitude toward the events going on around them, but behind the facade of tennis parties and army camp dances, all know that the end is approaching--the end of British rule in the south of Ireland and the demise of a way of life that had survived for centuries. Their niece, Lois Farquar, attempts to live her own life and gain her own freedoms from the very class that her elders are vainly defending. The Last September depicts the tensions between love and the longing for freedom, between tradition and the terrifying prospect of independence, both political and spiritual.
"Brilliant.... A successful combination of social comedy and private tragedy."--"The Times Literary Supplement (London)

About the Author

Elizabeth Bowen was born in Dublin in 1899. She wrote many acclaimed novels, including The Heat if the Day and Eva Trout. She was awarded the CBE (Commander if the Order of the British Empire) in 1948. She died in 1973.

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3.8 out of 53.8 out of 5
140 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Therese D. Barry
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Poetic phrases; no likeable characters.
Reviewed in the United States on March 2, 2017
This is a slowly moving story; bored people who do very little do not make for an exciting read. The not likeable characters are deliberately vapid, moving though their pointless lives, worried about petty things while their country is falling apart. But the language is... See more
This is a slowly moving story; bored people who do very little do not make for an exciting read. The not likeable characters are deliberately vapid, moving though their pointless lives, worried about petty things while their country is falling apart. But the language is clever and beautiful, " Strokes of the gong, brass bubbles, came bouncing up from the hall."
While this is not a style of writing that story that are popular today, it''s an interesting look into the "troubled times" in Ireland. The author''s preface is a good explanation of how some people tried to carry on while things were changing rapidly around them.
6 people found this helpful
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N. Gallo
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Four Stars
Reviewed in the United States on April 26, 2018
Very complex characters and plot but enjoyable read. Makes me want to read more of Ms Bowen. There''s a cold clinical description of the characters as specimens in a crisis they are barely aware of. As it develops, they try to come to grips with it. Tough time to be a... See more
Very complex characters and plot but enjoyable read. Makes me want to read more of Ms Bowen. There''s a cold clinical description of the characters as specimens in a crisis they are barely aware of. As it develops, they try to come to grips with it. Tough time to be a teenager.
7 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Disappointed ultimately.
Reviewed in the United States on March 29, 2021
I really enjoyed the first third or so of the book. The setting in Ireland in the twenties told from the point of view of wealthy Irish with ties to England was interesting. Ultimately I don''t think the characters were developed in a way that made me care about them. Ended... See more
I really enjoyed the first third or so of the book. The setting in Ireland in the twenties told from the point of view of wealthy Irish with ties to England was interesting. Ultimately I don''t think the characters were developed in a way that made me care about them. Ended up being disappointed in the book overall
2 people found this helpful
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Anne G.
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Sad, slow, and perceptive
Reviewed in the United States on September 19, 2013
This is a sad book, but full of perceptive, biting wit. Set on an Anglo-Irish estate before the Troubles swept Ireland in 1920, the story is full of obtuse, privileged people who fail to recognize their own emotions or the tenuousness of their rarified status - and are... See more
This is a sad book, but full of perceptive, biting wit. Set on an Anglo-Irish estate before the Troubles swept Ireland in 1920, the story is full of obtuse, privileged people who fail to recognize their own emotions or the tenuousness of their rarified status - and are absolutely incapable of communicating anything they do figure out. This lack of political and personal self-awareness shroud the story, which focuses on a young woman''s restless questioning of herself and her future; in the end, the story''s muted yet violent resolution leaves you despairing of her ever coming into her own.
9 people found this helpful
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booky female
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Time to move on from this one.
Reviewed in the United States on January 9, 2018
I looked and looked and couldn’t find a plot anywhere. I found interchangeable characters, all from the same narrow segment of society, moving through a specific period in Irish history, the significance of which appears lost on them. I adore Bowen for the sheer beauty of... See more
I looked and looked and couldn’t find a plot anywhere. I found interchangeable characters, all from the same narrow segment of society, moving through a specific period in Irish history, the significance of which appears lost on them. I adore Bowen for the sheer beauty of the writing, but shouldn’t there be a plot or some character development somewhere?
5 people found this helpful
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Christin M. Mulligan
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Oblivious Politically But Interesting Stylistically
Reviewed in the United States on August 2, 2015
My distaste for Elizabeth Bowen and Lois, the self-obsessed protagonist of her novel, <i> The Last September </i>, set in the face of the anti-colonial turmoil of the War for Irish Independence, is not misinformed. The character’s Anglo-Irish superiority and willful... See more
My distaste for Elizabeth Bowen and Lois, the self-obsessed protagonist of her novel, <i> The Last September </i>, set in the face of the anti-colonial turmoil of the War for Irish Independence, is not misinformed. The character’s Anglo-Irish superiority and willful obliviousness outrages me because Bowen portrays it as entirely natural and without irony, even with an elegiac wistfulfulness that sets my teeth on edge. Lois, one could argue like the rest of her family who are all virtually unaffected by the violence outside the walls of their estate, prefers her own fantasies to reality. Am I guilty of similar transgressions when I become immersed in my work, my life, at the expense of all else? The idea makes me shudder. Bowen seems to take in stride, as if silly girls are destined to become silly women, as if that is the proper way of the world and there are no other possibilities for them.

Lois is infatuated with Gerald, a British Black and Tan, but she also briefly imagines being in love with a married friend of her uncle’s, Mr. Montmorency, who literally could have been her father as he was once in love with Lois’ mother. She is fond of making outlandish pronouncements such as, "I hate women. But I can''t think how to be anything else," and dreaming up romantic, idyllic European tours where she can travel unfettered and alone (unheard of for a lady in that day) to places where people “don’t care for politics.” Don’t get me wrong, I don’t agree with those repressive and delimiting attitudes, but nevertheless, I can still resent the naïve and ridiculous mindsets they foster in these pale, privileged, delicate but useless women. (I have more respect for Molly Bloom, and as anyone who reads my work knows, Marion and I are hardly bff, because Joyce uses her as a tool to valorize an anti-intellectual purely sensual (not to mention slutty) and chauvinistic portrayal of women.) Calling Lois insufferable really doesn’t cover it. While she and her friends are obsessing over petty social slights, houseguests, the weather, and tennis parties, Gerald and his fellows at-arms are out capturing and murdering rebels and innocent civilians in the name of God and Empire without so much as a second thought. I wish I could maintain the guise of critical objectivity, but I find Lois and Bowen, as her creator, utterly abhorrent. I want to smack their smug, Ascendancy faces.

So, Gerald ends up murdered in an ambush after dumping Lois, who heads to Tours. In February, after her departure, Danielstown and the two other local Big Houses are burned to the ground. I can’t call it an entirely satisfying conclusion because Lois doesn’t seem genuinely devastated or irrevocably altered by Gerald’s death, or if she is, Bowen doesn’t do an effective job of portraying her as such. In fact, there is very little of Lois’ inner turmoil; she flees to the garden to see the last place she and Gerald spoke, but she is not weeping uncontrollably and inconsolably. She seems to stoically endure in a rather uncompelling way. Trust, I am the queen of subtlety and can find a way to rationalize pretty much any turn on a dime conversion. As previously stated, I have a very forgiving heart but there was no perceptible change.

I think the whole project of the novel is a strange one and crystallizes in Lois’ cousin, Laurence’s dreams of an alternative past, present, and future with different outcomes. Laurence is the standard laze-about abstract Oxbridge type, reminiscent of Tibby in E.M. Forster''s <i> Howards End </i>. Lois, too, from her romance with Gerald to her friendship with Marda Norton is full of fantasy. The Naylors and the Montmorencys seem likewise willfully unaware of the conditions of violence that surround them, even if they are ostensibly offended by the actions of the army—they do nothing and barely react at all beyond some brief complaining— until one of the other officers comes to Danielstown to announce Gerald’s death. The whole environment of <i> The Last September </i> with its focus on minor social dramas and privileged malaise with national conflict as merely a minor annoyance in the backdrop, a ripple that barely troubles the placidly banal surface of their lives until smack-bang at the novel''s end, seems to function as Bowen’s own dream of alternative universe unmarred by struggle. Yet ignorance is not bliss, but ennui.
7 people found this helpful
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regates
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The relationship drama was boring and whatever crisis I wanted to see the main ...
Reviewed in the United States on September 11, 2015
The slow pace made me stop reading, right before the end. I just stopped caring. The relationship drama was boring and whatever crisis I wanted to see the main character through, I couldn''t stand the thought of having to wait 80 more pages to get there. Some of the... See more
The slow pace made me stop reading, right before the end. I just stopped caring. The relationship drama was boring and whatever crisis I wanted to see the main character through, I couldn''t stand the thought of having to wait 80 more pages to get there. Some of the interactions are interesting, once they happen, but it''s not enough to save the book
One person found this helpful
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Roger Brunyate
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The end of an era
Reviewed in the United States on August 27, 2005
An account of coming-of-age on a great estate in Ireland just before independence. Totally brilliant (though often knowingly vapid) as a portrait of upper-class life, with its tennis parties, discreet servants, and do-nothing guests. The "Troubles" remain mostly in the... See more
An account of coming-of-age on a great estate in Ireland just before independence. Totally brilliant (though often knowingly vapid) as a portrait of upper-class life, with its tennis parties, discreet servants, and do-nothing guests. The "Troubles" remain mostly in the background, though they are not forgotten. The writing is evocative and perceptive ("The ladies were in the drawing-room laughing intimately, putting across the open door a barrier of exclusion") though at times rather overwrought in a Hopkinslike manner. Unfortunately, Bowen''s stylistic self-consiousness rather veils the all-too-real tragedy taking place in and around her young heroine, but it is there all the same.
10 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

S RiazTop Contributor: Children''s Books
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Last September
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 19, 2020
Published in 1929, this novel is set firmly in Bowen''s own experiences. She, herself, grew up in a ''Big House,'' Anglo-Irish house. In the case of this novel, the house - almost a character in itself - is ''Danielstown'' in Co. Cork, owned by Sir Richard and Lady Naylor. Also...See more
Published in 1929, this novel is set firmly in Bowen''s own experiences. She, herself, grew up in a ''Big House,'' Anglo-Irish house. In the case of this novel, the house - almost a character in itself - is ''Danielstown'' in Co. Cork, owned by Sir Richard and Lady Naylor. Also staying are Laurence, usually found with a book in his hand, and young Lois, an orphaned niece and central character of the novel. Set in 1920, a house which has been an oasis of privilege, now has Sinn Fein gunmen on the periphery of the lawn; indeed, Lois, out walking in the garden, feels a man walking by her in the trees. A gunman? The inhabitants of the house are keen to downplay the danger and have a tendency to see the English as ''others,'' in a way, so that they can cling to their own sense of belonging. During the novel, there are visits. Many are neighbours, who are not only known to the Naylor''s, but their ancestors are also familiar. They are part of a world that is in danger, but those who have lived for generations are loathe to admit the changes. When one visitor, Francie Montmorency ventures whether sitting on the steps in the evening may involve the risk of being shot at, she is genially decried as getting, ''very English.'' Other visitors include young, English officers, who are ideal for tennis parties, but definitely seen as socially below the inhabitants of Danielstown,'' and their neighbours. Bowen covers some very important topics in this novel and many events are quite tragic. However, her writing is slow, personal and almost genteel at times. We see everything through the eyes of Lois, who is a young girl, just discovering the world and her place in it. I find this a really fascinating account of a time, and people, from an author who was very much an insider of that world and the characters she portrays.
4 people found this helpful
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Roman Clodia
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Elegiac and haunting
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 12, 2020
Set in 1920 but written in 1928 when the partition of Ireland had already happened, this is an elegiac book that continues to haunt. Attentive to all the complications of Irish history and the liminal position of the land-owning Anglo-Irish family at its heart, this plays...See more
Set in 1920 but written in 1928 when the partition of Ireland had already happened, this is an elegiac book that continues to haunt. Attentive to all the complications of Irish history and the liminal position of the land-owning Anglo-Irish family at its heart, this plays out the story of a young woman''s coming of age against an especially fraught background. Mesmerising prose and taut control showcase Bowen at her best.
2 people found this helpful
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Sightseer
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Ripped off!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 2, 2021
Extremely disappointed to be charged for a sample book that is clearly marked "not for resale" because it is a free copy!! This is illegal!
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Mr JD Meagan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 26, 2018
very good item and service
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Amazon Customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Go on, go on , go on
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 25, 2020
Nice to get a view from an Anglo Irish perspective.
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The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale

The discount Last 2021 September outlet sale